Conference program

Conference day: full schedule

08:30 - 09:00 Welcome and registration
09:00 - 09:15 Introduction and OWASP update by Irfaan Santoe
09:15 - 10:00 Grant Ongers 100x your AppSec Program
10:00 - 10:45 Jeroen Willemsen and Ben De Haan CTF Kickoff with OWASP WrongSecrets
10:45 - 11:00 Break
11:00 - 11:45 Ben Brucker Social engineering and physical entry, a Red Teamer's toolbox
11:45 - 12:30 Bram Patelski Security by Meme - Less FUD, more FUN
12:30 - 13:30 Lunch
13:30 - 14:15 Daniel Kapellmann Zafra & Ken Proska INCONTROLLER - New Malware Developed to Target Industrial Control Systems
14:15 - 15:00 Colin Domoney Are your APIs rugged?
15:00 - 15:15 Break
15:15 - 16:00 Koen Yskout Assessing the state of practice of threat modeling in Dutch organizations
16:00 - 16:45 Brenno de Winter When hackers and cats help - Redesigning security during a crisis
16:45 - 17:00 Closing note by Sebastien Deleersnyder


Confirmed speakers for Thursday 24/11/2022:


  • 100x your AppSec Program by Grant Ongers

    09:15 - 10:00

    Abstract:

    Developers outnumber security folks about 100 to 1. They are super smart and they care about the code that they write. Getting developers onboard with your AppSec program is how to scale your ability to secure all that code a hundred times better than we can today. There are a number of OWASP projects we use to help do this both commercially and as part of the work we are doing in the OWASP Open Application Security Curriculum project.


    Bio:

    Co-founder of Secure Delivery and current OWASP Global Foundation board member, Grant Ongers (@rewtd), is a firm believer in security enabling delivery, not blocking it. Well known in the international InfoSec community (it's hard to forget the beard!), his 10+ years' experience in Dev, 20 years in Ops and 30 years in Sec (mostly white hat) has made him a firm believer that there's no such thing as DevSecOps - just DevOps done right, and that compliance != security (or the other way around). Alongside his role as CTO within Secure Delivery, Grant provides C-suite advice and guidance on security to FTSE100 enterprises and strategic risk analysis within M&A diligence teams.


  • CTF Kickoff with OWASP WrongSecrets by Jeroen Willemsen and Ben De Haan

    10:00 - 10:45

    Abstract:

    Want to have a go at secrets hunting? Enter OWASP WrongSecrets! You won’t get our demonstration. Instead, you’ll go on a secrets hunt yourself with this custom made CTF for this event. During this session, we will share the domain and credentials for which you can register in order to play a CTF until 15h00! The winner of the CTF goes home with a surprise prize. Hope to see you there!


    Bio:

    Jeroen Willemsen is the project lead of OWASP WrongSecrets and a jack of all trades in security. He loves to develop new software, set up DevSecOps support tooling, and help companies with security programs. He enjoys sharing knowledge, which is why he published articles, and blogs and gave trainings and talks about various subjects.
    Ben is a DevOps/Security/Site reliability Consultant and Engineer, and co-project leader of OWASP WrongSecrets. My specialties are architecting and implementing cloud services and building secure CI/CD environments. Ben believes security should be built-in and can be scaled to meet these modern ways of working. Outside of typical work I enjoy public speaking and hosting trainings or workshops, and I’m an AWS Meetup regular.


  • Social engineering and physical entry, a Red Teamer's toolbox by Ben Brucker

    11:00 - 11:45

    Abstract:

    As a hacker, obtaining access to companies is generally getting harder and harder as a result of better security posture and more secure networks and software. However, how secure is your organization when a hacker just walks into your building? In this talk Ben will show you the motivations and techniques of attackers that resort to this initial access tactic.
    Examples will be shown from Secura's own physical social engineering assessments that were performed in a Red Teaming context. In addition, Ben will demonstrate a number of tools that Secura's Red Team is using to break into secure organizations. So, do you want to see in real life how to clone a physical key or a badge, and how to use lockpicks and other fun tools? Join this talk!


    Bio:

    With over 8 years of experience, Ben Brücker is Secura's domain lead for Red Teaming and a senior security specialist. As an avid fan of Social Engineering, he specializes in initial access techniques where he obtains access via any means necessary, whether it be phishing, vishing or physical entry. Also, in his role as Red Teaming lead it is Ben's responsibility to continually improve Secura's RT service offering.
    Besides his operational work, Ben is a trainer for a number of courses, including a Secure Programming, Mobile Security, and Threat Modeling course.


  • Security by Meme - Less FUD, more FUN by Bram Patelski

    11:45 - 12:30

    Abstract:

    Let's make security fun again. With a pile of memes, I will make you laugh and show you security can be easy and fun.
    Security experts are perfectly capable of scaring us with FUD: Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt. Horror stories of accounts hacked in seconds, Bank accounts and Crypto wallets drained, smart devices taken over and baby monitors and home security cameras spying on their owners.
    While those stories are in theory true, they also scare us into thinking security is nearly impossible, even for experts. Yes, there is no such thing as 100% security. But we can achieve 99% more security with only 1% effort.
    Let me take you on a trip through Security by meme.


    Bio:

    AppSec Engineer, Security Champion and Java Developer at Ordina.
    Bram has been working in Software development since early 2000. While already interested in everything security and privacy related, his calling came when rewatching a presentation at DevoxxUK by pentester FC . Since then, Bram has done secure code analysis, created and taught AppSec training for developers, provides valuable input for the security program at his company and presented at several universities and software development companies.


  • INCONTROLLER - New Malware Developed to Target Industrial Control Systems by Daniel Kapellmann Zafra & Ken Proska

    13:30 - 14:15

    Abstract:

    Only a few times in history we have seen publicly documented malware developed to target industrial control systems (ICS). Over ten years ago STUXNET impacted Iranian nuclear centrifuges. Then INDUSTROYER turned off electric power in Ukraine and TRITON targeted the safety systems from a critical infrastructure organization. Today, a couple years later, we ran into INCONTROLLER.
    INCONTROLLER is a set of novel ICS- oriented attack tools built to target specific Schneider Electric and Omron devices that are embedded in different types of machinery leveraged across multiple industries. The tools – which are very likely state-sponsored – represent an exceptionally rare and dangerous cyber-attack that contains capabilities related to disruption, sabotage, and potentially physical destruction. In this talk I will present our analysis of INCONTROLLER, its components, attack scenarios, and the implications for defenders.


    Bio:

    Analysis Manager for Google Cloud/Mandiant where he oversees the strategic coverage of cyber physical threat intelligence and information operations. He also coordinates the development of solutions to collect and analyze data. He is a frequent speaker on ICS/OT topics at international conferences and collaborates as international liaison for the ICS Joint Working Group Steering Team from CISA. As a former Fulbright scholar from Mexico, he holds a master’s degree from the University of Washington specialized in Information Security and Risk Management. In 2017, he was awarded first place at Kaspersky Academy Talent Lab's competition for designing an application to address security beyond anti-virus.


  • Are your APIs rugged? by Colin Domoney

    14:15 - 15:00

    Abstract:

    The Rugged Manifesto threw down the gauntlet to developers – is your code more than secure, is it also rugged? Is it resilient and able to withstand attacks from talented and well-funded adversaries? If you're an API developer you are on the frontline when it comes to building rugged software since your APIs are likely to be public-facing, well documented, discoverable, and constantly under attack.
    In this session, we explore the OWASP API Top 10 vulnerabilities and other challenges that face API developers when building a secure API. We show how to leverage the power of the OpenAPI specification to better understand how to protect specific endpoints and responses, how to constrain input and output data, and how to use a variety of API test tooling to verify the specification and the API implementation.
    Finally, we'll review several recent high-profile API breaches and recreate the underlying issues to gain a deeper insight into the root cause and how to defend against such errors.


    Bio:

    Colin Domoney is an API security research specialist and developer advocate with 42Crunch. He oversees the development of the 42Crunch community and curates the ApiSecurity.io industry newsletter. Colin has a long and varied career in producing secure, rugged, and trustable software and hardware products covering a range of industries from military, consumer, medical, automotive to financial services. Colin has recently built and consulted on large-scale AppSec programs and oversaw Deutsche Bank's global AppSec program, and is an expert and enthusiast on all things DevSecOps. Colin is also a regular conference speaker and DevOps instructor and is currently authoring the industry's first book on defending APIs.


  • Assessing the state of practice of threat modeling in Dutch organizations by Koen Yskout

    15:15 - 16:00

    Abstract:

    We are currently conducting an empirical research project (in the form of interviews) on the use of security threat modeling in several large Dutch corporations, commissioned by the Dutch NCSC. Our goal is to describe the current state of practice regarding threat modeling, by mapping how threat modeling is embedded within the organizations, which roles are involved, how threat modeling activities are conducted in practice, and what are the experiences of the participants. While this research is still ongoing, in this talk we will present the research process, our own experiences as researchers, and offer a glimpse at some preliminary findings and insights.


    Bio:

    Koen is a research manager in the DistriNet research group of KU Leuven, working on the secure software engineering (security by design) research track. He has more than 15 years of research experience related to threat modeling and other architectural and design-level processes, models, notations, and patterns for security. He is particularly interested in the use of automation for designing secure software, as well as empirical investigations on the human aspects of secure software engineering.


  • When hackers and cats help - Redesigning security during a crisis by Brenno de Winter

    16:00 - 16:45

    Abstract:

    In 2020, when the pandemic started, scientists suggested to also digitally support fighting the pandemic. One of the suggestions was digitally supported contact tracing. After first asking the market for solutions the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport decided to self build open, privacy friendly, secure and accessible solutions with help of a large open source community. When vaccinations became available and timeframes for building solutions were near impossible the next step was clear: get hackers involved. This isn’t just to stick to the values, but also to create solutions in ways that aren’t always common for governments. How do you hack processes and rules to create what some ministries called magic? This talk will tell the inside hacker tale of the pandemic and show the dilemmas that were overcome.
    This is a story of hackers in a ministry at the heat of the moment.


    Bio:

    Brenno de Winter, 1971, wrote his first software at the age of 5. He has been in IT ever since. From 2001 to 2016 he was an investigative journalist on technology issues and became journalist of the year for hacking the public transportion rfid-cards. Sinds may 2020 he is Chief Security and Privacy Operations at the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport for the program Realisation Digital Support COVID19.